WONDER-ROOMS OR CABINETS OF CURIOSITIES

In the Renaissance, royalty, nobles and middle class created these “wonder-rooms” to treasure extraordinary objects. In the 18th century, these spaces were opened to the public, democratising the knowledge of natural history at a period when not everyone had access to such knowledge. In 1788 the skeleton of Megatherium americanum, an extinct giant sloth, arrived at the National Museum of Natural Sciences (Madrid).
Discover Historias de la Prehistoria with us on Spotify.


LITHIC INDUSTRY: "THUNDERSTONE"

Did you know that lithic tools had already been found in Roman period? It is difficult to determine with certainty what kind of questions were asked at that time, what we do know is the type of answer they gave about the origin of these “curious stones”, which were triangular in shape and, in many cases, polished; answers based on their mythological beliefs.
Lithic tools were interpreted as lightning bolts from the god Zeus falling from the heavens. A peculiar approach, but one that fitted the paradigm of the time.  In medieval times these “curious stones” were treasured in “cabinets of curiosities”.
The paradigms of each era influence the way we see and understand the world, shaping the questions we ask and the answers we get or interpret.
If you want to know more “Historias de la Prehistoria“, you can listen to our podcast on Spotify!


CALL FOR POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHER

JOIN OUR TEAM!

APPLY FOR THE NEW POSITION OF TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHER IN

TOPOGRAPHY, SPATIAL ANALYSIS AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

The purpose of this contract is to carry out the research work envisaged as part of DEATHREVOL project, directed at spatial analysis for integrating the study of the archaeological contexts analyzed in the project.

DEADLINE: MARCH 27TH 2024

STARTING DATE: MAY 1ST 2024

More details here: https://www.cenieh.es/sobre-el-cenieh/empleo/042024-erc-2020-stg-deathrevol


"CURIOSITIES" FOR SALE: MARY ANNING

Did you know that, despite all her scientific achievements, Mary Anning was never allowed to be part of the scientific community? She was sentenced to invisibility and silenced by her peers.
The “Matilda Effect” condemns this phenomenon of invisibility of women in science and STEM degrees, in part promoted by the lack of female references to inspire scientific vocation in girls and women. This effect has deprived many female scientists from appearing in books.
Don’t forget her name: Mary Anning ♥
In order to learn more about these and other curiosities of palaeontology, you can listen to the first episode of our podcast Historias de la Prehistoriaon Spotify.


FOSSILS AND REVOLUTION: GEORGES CUVIER

Thinking outside the box. That is what Georges Cuvier did in the 18th century. His innovative method of comparative anatomy made possible to decode fossil mysteries, such as the Megatherium, and to know their evolutionary histories. He was a pioneer in introducing the idea of extinction, challenging previous beliefs and paving the way for evolutionary ideas.
Are you passionate about paleontology? You can listen to our podcast Historias de la Prehistoriaon Spotify in order to learn more about this science.


DEATHREVOL PODCAST: HISTORIAS DE LA PREHISTORIA

Discover the fascinating world of prehistory with our podcast in Spanish “HISTORIAS DE LA PREHISTORIA”! We start today with the first episode!
We will explore the mysteries and discoveries that have shaped our understanding of human paleontology. From the prejudices of the past to the most relevant characters, each episode immerses us in a unique historical journey.
Don’t miss any detail! We will be posting a new episode every 15 days, with a total of 8 episodes to keep you hooked. Join us and immerse yourself in a world full of curiosities and knowledge.
You can listen to it on our website and on Spotify.
We are waiting for you!


INTERNATIONAL WOMEN´S DAY 2024

Today, March 8th, we celebrate a milestone in the history of paleoanthopology!
On International Women’s Day, we pay tribute to Lucy, one of the most famous fossils that has revolutionized our understanding of human evolution. Discovered by the paleontologists Donald Johanson, Yves Coppens and Maurice Taieb in 1974 in Ethiopia.
On this International Women’s Day, our small tribute to Lucy and all the women who have left an indelible mark on history.
Lucy is an ancestor of ours. Very remote, because it has been calculated that she is more than three million years old… A young girl who roamed the Ethiopian region of Afar. She was small, no more than one meter tall, she had no claws or large canines, but she had a great capacity for adaptation and survival. She was very young when death surprised her, we do not know if she would have had children by then, but it is possible that a little of her blood runs through our veins. She, or her companions, are part of our history, without them we would not be here.


TRAVELLING WITH DEATHREVOL: ANDENNE AND LIEGE (BELGIUM)

On this trip to Belgium, we had the opportunity to study the Scladina fossil remains at EMA – Andenne Museum Space and the Engis fossil collection at Evolution & Diversity Dynamics Lab of the University of Liège. Thanks to the hospitality of Dominique Bonjean and Valentin Fischer.

In the picture you can find the sculpture of Philippe-Charles Schmerling, located at the University of Liège. Schmerling was the discoverer of the first Neanderthal fossils in history in the Engis caves in Belgium. One hundred years after Schmerling’s death, the Engis 2 skull was classified as Neanderthal, thus becoming one of the most iconic fossils in the history of Paleoanthropology, placing Schmerling among the pioneers of this discipline.


INTERNATIONAL DAY OF WOMEN AND GIRLS IN SCIENCE 2024

Today, February 11, we celebrate the International Day of Women and Girls in Science with a tribute to our earliest predecessors. The Tabun 1, a Neanderthal woman whose remains have revealed valuable secrets about our evolutionary history. Did you know that Dorothy Garrod was the first woman to hold a professorship at Cambridge University? From pioneers who defied barriers to the bright young minds leading the way into the future, every woman in science inspires.